Advices

Get Better, Not Bitter

Get Better, Not Bitter



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Illustration by Elaine Liu

Post-Valentine's blues got you down? Don't blame cupid and his arrows. Big life changes (read: divorce, losing a job, getting passed over by the one we love on V-day, etc.) can bring on some seriously negative emotions like anxiety, depression, and anger (a disorder known as posttraumatic embitterment disorder or PTED). But those emotions have more negative repercussions than just grumpiness.

Turning into Oscar the Grouch can also have physical effects. Being bitter is associated with changes in metabolism, immune system function, and organ function. So it's time for the obvious solution: forgiveness. Folks who forgive are typically less stressed, healthier, use less alcohol and medication, and have better relationships (no surprise there).

The Takeaway: Take a minute today to mentally let go of unattainable and disappointing goals, a cheating ex, or the annoying fact that your housemate never takes out the trash. You'll be healthier for it.

Dress for Happiness

Dressing well may also be the key to feeling better. It can boost self-confidence, give others a better impression of us, and just generally increase happier (especially for women).

Fun Fact:

In 2010, American households spent an average of $1700 on buying and caring for their clothes.